Sudha Murty

Sudha Murty
Riding for Vinay Mahajanam
Cancer is the biggest killer of kids from disease in the USA, 38 children die every week. Please donate now and support my challenge to fight kids' cancer!
I've Ridden 426.2 mi to fight kids' cancer
My Rankings
  • National: 18th
  • State: 4th in TX
  • My Team: 1st
I've raised $11,107.38 to fight kids' cancer Donate Now

I'm Riding For

Vinay Mahajanam

Vinay Mahajanam

Vinay is the sweetest boy I know who completed 3.5 years of leukemia treatment at Texas Children's Hospital. Aftter 1218 cancer treatment days, 1299 chemo doses, 15 emergency visits, 64 days admitted in hospital, 74 office visits, 31IV pokes, 39 finger pokes, 80 port pokes, 40 pendamadine breathing treatments, 8 Blood transfusions, 14 Platelet transfusions, 3 Bone marrow biopsies, 6 ECG/Echo and 26 lumbar punctures,.... we are finally DONE!!! It has been 8 months of being cancer-free, and the last 3.5 years already seems like a distant nightmare of the past. Despite the shadow of the C-word always haunting us in the back of our minds, as we deal with chemo after-effects like attention issues and learning difficulties, Vinay has a never-say-die spirit and resilience that amazes me. We are so THANKFUL he is doing well. I will ride for you Vinay, and this GCC, you will ride with me! I will always hope for better treatments for kids in the future.

My Story

This September, I am taking part in the Great Cycle Challenge to fight kids' cancer!

Why? Because right now, cancer is the biggest killer of children from disease in the United States. Over 15,700 children are diagnosed every year, and sadly, 38 children die of cancer every week.

Kids should be living life, not fighting for it.

So I am raising funds through my challenge to help these kids and support Children's Cancer Research Fund to allow them to continue their work to develop lifesaving treatments and find a cure for childhood cancer.

Please support me by making a donation to give these kids the brighter futures they deserve.

Your support will change little lives.

Thank you.

Sudha

My Challenge

  • 11.3 mi ride - Lunch Ride - Wednesday, October 7, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 14 days ago
  • 4.0 mi ride - Evening Ride - Friday, October 2, 2020
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    Logged this ride 18 days ago
  • Day 30: $10,495 raised, 10 night miles done! 410 miles in Sep. THANK you to all of you for your support!!
    1 Oct 2020

    Consistency. The one key trait that I truly struggle with. I can never take my vitamins regularly. Yet, there can be no mistakes when you have to give your child chemo for 2.5 years of maintenance, every single day. Life almost goes back to normal in this stage, yet, the cost of such an error could be life-threatening. We made sure we never slipped up from our end.

    Our doctor had explained to us why it was such a big deal to continue these toxic drugs for months and months and months, after Vinay already went through a year of horrible intensive chemo. Cancer cells were not detected in his blood within a few months of starting cancer treatment in 2016, and he was in remission. Why did maintenance have to be for so long?

    Leukemia is a disease where it is seems deceptively easy to kill the cancer, but it is very, very hard to kill every single cell. A lone cancer cell could play hide-n-seek in the body, undetectable by any instrument. If the drugs were stopped early, that single cancer cell could bide its time, and suddenly, start multiplying rapidly. It could do that hours, days or even months after stopping the chemo. If that happened, the new cancer cells would be resistant to EVERY single chemo previously give, and that would be devastating.

    My doc told me about some parents had stopped giving chemo during the long maintenance phase. 80% of such kids relapsed with cancer.

    Sudhakar and I have never missed a dose, and we had to work as a team to ensure consistency. We devised a calendar method, that worked for us. Whenever we gave Vinay the medicine, immediately, we wrote the time we gave the medicine, beside the name of the drug, in a different color.

    Prior to this method, during the intensive phase, we would frequently forget: ``did we give the dose already, or was it yesterday?'' If we had one tablet left, we wondered, ``Did we forget a day, or did the pharmacy make a mistake and give us an extra tablet?''

    Just as we could never skip Vinay's chemotherapy even for a single day, I did not skip riding in the great cycling challenge even for a single day this September.

    I am thrilled that since the last year, there have been new advances in research, and a kid like Vinay diagnosed with the same cancer, would only have cancer treatment for 2.5 years instead of 3.5 like Vinay!! I am honored and humbled by the enormous support from all of you, 10 miles today, and 410 miles in all. THANK YOU to all of you amazing supporters, who also dream of a day without childhood cancer. THANK YOU ALL !!

    Day 30: $10,495 raised, 10 night miles done! 410 miles in Sep. THANK you to all of you for your support!!
    Posted 20 days ago
  • 7.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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    Logged this ride 20 days ago
  • 3.3 mi ride - Night Ride - Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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    Logged this ride 20 days ago
  • Day 29: $10,247 raised, 32 miles done and RIDE GOAL MET!! 400 miles completed.
    30 Sep 2020

    In late 2017, an excited couple Jim and Laura, eagerly awaited to welcome their 4th precious child into this world, going through routine normal labor, after a perfectly healthy pregnancy.

    The moment her baby was born, Laura was suddenly alarmed to see the doctor worriedly whispering to the nurse, both looking at her precious newborn with immense concern. One look at her husband's face, and she instantly knew something was very wrong.

    Benjamin was born with a large bump on his little bottom. After a nail-biting week long wait for the biopsy results, all while caring for the new baby care and 3 other older kids, they were devastated to discover that the growth was CANCER. Infantile fibrosarcoma.

    Laura and Jim were utterly devastated to learn that it was a malignant cancer. Unbeknownst to anyone, poor Benjamin got cancer while developing in his mother's womb, detected only after his birth. While this type of cancer rarely spreads, the parents were further shocked to learn that their sweet, new bundle of joy was an exception. Benjamin's cancer had already spread to his lungs.

    It speaks volumes to the enormous strength of courage and firm resolve, that instead of buckling under this terrible diagnosis, the parents resolved themselves to do everything it took to save their son, one step at a time. With great trepidation, they decided to go forward and enroll their son in new clinical trials for a brand new drug that emerged out of the latest cancer research. One that targeted exactly the kind of cancer that Benjamin had. They took a giant leap of faith into the great unknown, trusting the research, hoping for the very best, as Benjamin was one of the youngest ever, to be treated with these new drugs. Would it work?

    The treatment itself was simple. Twice-a-day oral medication at home. It was a stressful 6 week wait before they could know if the drugs were working. It was an enormous relief to learn that after 6 weeks, the oral drug had completely dissolved the tumor in his lungs, and the tumor on his bottom was reduced by 70%! In September, Benjamin had surgery to remove the remaining mass, and the parents were elated that the drug had completely dissolved the tumor and only scar tissue remained. The medicine Ben took has now been FDA approved! He stayed on the medication for six months post-surgery. Unfortunately, they found a reoccurrence of cancer in his lung late last year and Benjamin had a thoracotomy in December where they removed his entire upper lobe of his right lung. Surgery and recovery went perfectly and he has had clear scans since! Nine months cancer free! He’ll be three years old in November and continues to thrive and develop “normally”. Laura said, "I am overwhelmed daily at the blessings that have filled his little life."

    This is the story of Laura Grant, Director of events and partnerships, at CCRF "Children's Cancer Research Fund". Yes, the same organization we have all been donating to!

    In mom's words: 'I came to CCRF after Benjamin's diagnosis as I wanted to work for an organization that was really moving the needle on the research, so desperately needed for these kids. Without prior advancements in research, Benjamin would have had a much different journey. It is our hope that all kids facing cancer can have the safe, effective treatments and positive outcomes that Benjamin has had.

    Today's ride was eventful. 25 mi into the ride, I slowed down to safely pass through a large protruding metal plate on the Post Oak bike path. Obviously I have balance issues, with feet stuck to the pedals, I fell straight onto my left hip as I landed on the metal. Thankfully, my hip saved my bike from injury, whew! I decided to complete the ride goal, as I have no idea how bad it could be tomorrow! I dedicate today's 32 mile ride to brave Benjamin, and hope he remains cancer free forever.

    Day 29: $10,247 raised, 32 miles done and RIDE GOAL MET!! 400 miles completed.
    Posted 21 days ago
  • 32.1 mi ride - Evening Ride - Tuesday, September 29, 2020
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    Logged this ride 21 days ago
  • Day 27-28: 19 more miles, thinking about community support.
    29 Sep 2020

    Cancer treatments are a community effort, from parents, family, friends, nurses, staff, doctors, and many more unseen people who work together to help get our children to safety.

    I was struck by the parallels I faced in the Great Cycle Challenge (GCC) community. This year, 134,667 riders have together raised $14 million, until now! Last year was my first time ever doing a fundraiser, sharing the story about Vinay, and even riding a bike regularly. It was a phenomenal event. A fellow rider Jeff Mulder, and I, were both raising incredible amounts >30K. It was exciting to watch the leaderboards, as we were both neck and neck, and it seemed like friendly competition, united for a common goal.

    You can imagine my astonishment when the 1st place rider Jeff Mulder donated $2000 to my 2019 fundraiser, to make my fundraiser 1st place! I then learned that he has been riding for cancer research for over a decade, though 2019 was the first time for both of us at GCC. I watched for a year as he rides with a flag, for multiple people with cancer, ALL year long. We treasure the 100 miler flag that Jeff Mulder gave to us, for the ride he did for Vinay. Just yesterday, thanks to his donation (based on my mileage!), along with a fellow Anonymous donor, I surpassed my goal of $10,000.

    My GCC team Team Soaring High, has been very inspiring. Almost everyone is doing the GCC fundraiser for the 1st time, and together we have already raised ~$19,000! Mike Joosten, a man in his 60's, is an absolute hero, he rode 250 miles with a torn foot tendon, as he decided the pain he felt was small compared to the pain of the kids undergoing treatments. Last year, he helped me with a 30 mile ride, and later, went on to do his own solo fundraiser for Children's cancer research! So glad he joined GCC and the team!

    Other riders in Team Soaring High have greatly inspired me with their incredible fundraising and awesome mileage. Aswathy in Cambridge, Alix, Sophia, Vivek, Nick : you all ride long mileages I love seeing your rides on Strava. Anupama, I have no idea how you do so many indoor miles. I struggle to ride indoors when I ride my bike on the trainer. Bravo! We also have a new Team member I do not know, D. Hampton, if you read this, welcome!

    Overall, I am struck by the feelings of camaraderie and community among the GCC riders, and I was reminded of a post by my friend Casi, and I share the photo that represents childhood cancer, hoping for the day when it wouldn't be the deadly disease it is today.

    Day 27-28: 19 more miles, thinking about community support.
    Posted 21 days ago
  • 14.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Monday, September 28, 2020
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    Logged this ride 22 days ago
  • 5.1 mi ride - Night Ride - Sunday, September 27, 2020
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    Logged this ride 23 days ago
  • Day 25-26: $10,195 raised, 30 miles for Benjamin Morris - a superhero who beat Pre-B Acute Lymphoblast Leukemia
    27 Sep 2020

    Below are some words from Ben's page :

    "Ben's journey began when his mom - Casi Morris noticed that he seemed to be losing weight. She began monitoring his weight, and within a few days knew there was a problem. She immediately took him to his pediatrician, who began running tests. It would take another arduous, frustrating 16 days to finally get the diagnosis. On March 22, 2013, Ben was diagnosed with Pre-B Acute Lymphoblast Leukemia. Once diagnosed, Ben was admitted to St. Francis in Tulsa, OK to begin induction (where the goal is to "induce" remission). Unfortunately, after 29 days remission was barely achieved and it was discovered that Ben had Minimal Residual Disease. This means that the cancer cells were still in his body, increasing his overall risk and his risk of relapse. He was removed from all studies and placed in the "Very High Risk" category. His survival rate plummeted from 95-98\% to 70-80\%. About BenjaMan It's hard having cancer when you're four and you don't really understand what all is going on. So Ben's parent's created BenjaMan, Benjamin's superhero alter-ego. BenjaMan can do ANYTHING! He is super brave and super strong and super speedy! The "cartoonized" version of BenjaMan was created to help ben process the treatments. The superhero theme was carried through to nearly all aspects of Ben's treatment. His port-a-cath is an arc reactor (Iron Man). His chemo is radioactive ooze that will mutate him into awesomeness (TMNT). His clinic visits always begin with a rambunctious, "It's Cancer Clobberin' Time!" (The Thing). We're just a normal family who's life was turned upside down by cancer. Our approach is simple: Be Flexible. Be Brave. Don't eat hospital food. And most importantly, keep your sense of humor. "Against the assault of laughter, nothing can stand.” ~ Mark Twain."

    Vani was Ben's classmate while still in daycare, and we were shocked to learn that Ben had cancer, and would not be coming to school that year. I followed Casi's journey for 3.5 years, and it was quite painful to watch him go through all the intense chemos, the side-effects the unexpected fevers, the works. I developed an intense admiration and respect for Casi Morris, as she balanced the well being of both her kids, while wearing a 100 different hats, with an amazing sense of humor. It is quite ironic that when Vinay was diagnosed with the exact same cancer 3 years later, I thought I knew what the journey would be like since I had followed Ben's journey quite closely.

    I was so badly mistaken. Nothing can truly prepare a family for what really awaits when one gets such a terrible diagnosis. Yet I took courage from the fact that Casi had shown the world it could be done, it could be beaten, and we do our best. Casi was the first person I called when I learned that my own son had cancer, I guess I just wanted to ask her, like Vinay does when about to get a poke, "Did I got this?"

    Today Ben is a thriving 11-year-old, and gives hope to other kids with such cancers. Despite continuing to battle lingering side-effects from chemo, he remains a brave warrior, ever cheerful and smiling.

    I did some very speedy miles through incredible sunsets and thought about you the entire time. These 30 miles are dedicated to you, Ben, congrats for kicking cancer's butt!

    Day 25-26: $10,195 raised, 30 miles for Benjamin Morris - a superhero who beat Pre-B Acute Lymphoblast Leukemia
    Posted 23 days ago
  • $10,000 raised to fight kids' cancer!

    I just hit $10,000 to fight kids' cancer! Thank you so much for your support.

    Posted 23 days ago
  • 10.0 mi ride - Evening Ride - Saturday, September 26, 2020
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    Logged this ride 24 days ago
  • 20.2 mi ride - Evening Ride - Friday, September 25, 2020
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    Logged this ride 25 days ago
  • Day 23-24: $8934 raised! 34 miles, thankful for all the blood donors
    25 Sep 2020

    Tropical storm Beta finally made its way out of Houston, and there were 2 amazing days of good weather to finally get some miles in, though my favorite George Bush trail was flooded! After 3 days of indoor rides, I was so happy to be out in the open again!

    I took Vinay for a 4 mile ride on the white oak bayou trail, and was thrilled to see him following instructions, and loving the speedy downhills. He has gotten stronger and so have I! I've noticed that I'm riding in a harder gear compared to when I began, and my heartrate is lower for the same intensity rides, so I've definitely gotten more efficient.

    I tend to take oxygen for granted, transported by red blood cells to my muscles. However, as every cancer family can attest, we have all seen the effects of lack of hemoglobin.

    The chemo given to kill the bad cancer cells also destroys the red blood cells. Cancer patients are given blood transfusions to recover. Vinay became limp and listless so many times due to insufficient oxygen due to low red blood cells. After a transfusion, he would be back! It was always scary though, as he had allergic reactions to blood many times. Yet, it is what has saved his life. He received 8 blood transfusions and 14 platelet transfusions for his treatment. We are so grateful to so many people who donate blood! These 34 miles are dedicated to all the amazing blood donors, who make cancer treatments possible.

    Day 23-24: $8934 raised! 34 miles, thankful for all the blood donors
    Posted 26 days ago
  • 10.2 mi ride - Night Ride - Thursday, September 24, 2020
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    Logged this ride 26 days ago
  • 4.1 mi ride - Evening Ride - Wednesday, September 23, 2020
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    Logged this ride 27 days ago
  • 20.0 mi ride - Afternoon Ride - Wednesday, September 23, 2020
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    Logged this ride 27 days ago
  • Day 20-22: 15 miles, reminiscing about Sep 22: 2014, 2016 and 2019.
    23 Sep 2020

    Sep 22, 2014: We were getting ready for 2 year old Vinay to have his open heart surgery to re-route a plumbing defect in his veins from one lung to the heart. The anxiety was at its peak on that day, as we took photos of Vinay, hoping the surgeon has a good day. Vinay recovered from that in 2 months, and went back to being a bratty 2 year old. Completely unrelated to the cancer he got ~2 years later.

    Sep 22, 2016: Also a very important day for Vinay. He finished the first 2 stages of cancer treatment, Induction and Consolidation, and he would begin stage 3: Interim Maintenance 1 as soon his counts recovered. On this day, his counts had recovered enough to begin a dreadful chemo in Stage 3.

    Some words I wrote on that day:

    "The good news is that Vinay made counts this week. In fact this last week was the first time Vinay started eating like a normal kid, and felt a lot more hungry. It took 3 weeks for his body to sort-of recover from phase 2 of chemo, and his ANC was 1400 yesterday.

    The sad news is that this new phase is hard. He had bone marrow biopsy, lumbar puncture, chemo in his spine, double sedation for a heart echo, and no food from 6:00am to 6:00pm, followed by admission into the hospital. He was begging for food all day, and when he was finally awake enough to eat, the new chemo started, and you can guess the first thing that happened: no more appetite. :(

    Anyway, he did eat some oatmeal yesterday eventually, but not much today. He gets a 24 hr long chemo (methotextrate) in his IV, which can really hurt his kidneys, and burn his mucus membranes from his mouth all the way through his stomach, to the intestines. It can apparently be so painful that kids cannot even take water, they need IV pain medication to eat. Some kids are lucky and don't get it that bad, we do not know how Vinay will react to this. He has to pee every 2 hrs, day and night, and after the first 24 hrs, he will be given another 48 hrs of fluids to flush the poison, I mean chemo, out. It will be a week before we go home, and this will repeat every other week."

    Long story short, Vinay did not react very well to this chemo, he had most of the side-effects we feared, luckily we got through them. Back then, we hadn't yet realized the significance of Sep 22, the day we were to start stage 3, would be the exact same day as the last day of cancer treatment 3 years later.

    Sep 22, 2019: END OF TREATMENT!! Can never celebrate that day enough. There was a certain "in-the-zone" mode that we as a family had to be in for the entire 3.5 years, to stay vigilant, and on top of the treatment plans. This was a great day, we were finally done, and celebrated at the waterpark.

    Sep 22, 2020: Today Vinay was mad the rains stopped him from going to school and had a fun day playing Roblux at home, zipping around on a scooter, making a mess with toys we thought we donated. We do cherish every day that is free from treatments and from cancer. Did not bike in the rains and floods, so did 15 slow indoor miles over 3 days, remembering the heart surgery in 2014, the start of stage 3 in 2016, and to celebrate the end of treatment on Sep 22, 2019.

    Day 20-22: 15 miles, reminiscing about Sep 22: 2014, 2016 and 2019.
    Posted 28 days ago
  • 5.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Tuesday, September 22, 2020
    Logged this ride 28 days ago
  • 5.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Monday, September 21, 2020
    Logged this ride 29 days ago
  • 5.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Sunday, September 20, 2020
    Logged this ride 30 days ago
  • Days 16 to 19: 42 miles for a brave survivor of medulloblastoma, a deadly brain cancer.
    20 Sep 2020

    In 2011, shortly after a vivacious little girl turned 4, her unsteady walking became worse and the first-thing-in-the-morning vomiting became a daily recurrence. After repeated doctor visits and a CT scan, the life of the whole family officially changed forever. She had grade 4 medulloblastoma, a very high-risk brain tumor; needing immediate surgery. The first surgery was done urgently in a local hospital on the 3rd day after diagnosis to release pressure in her head. She was then transferred to Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and had the tumor removal surgery on the 6th day. Four days later, she was sent to St. Jude's to begin treatment. She underwent 8 months of intense radiation and chemotherapy. Luckily the intensive treatments eradicated her cancer. YAY!

    Unfortunately, these treatments came at a heavy cost. Each chemo, the result of years of research proved essential to her survival, yet, left her with life-long side effects. She lost hearing in the high and some mid-frequency range and now wears hearing aids. One year post treatment, she started losing her vision and in just 2 weeks, she went from poor vision to being completely blind. The reason? Radiation-induced cataracts. After lens replacement eye surgeries, she regained vision with glasses. A lover of dance and gymnastics prior to cancer, she has since struggled with left side body weakness and balance issues. The mom, while talking about her precious daughter, said, "Those are minor issues. She mostly can hear, see, walk, but more importantly, she is still with us." Cancer changed their perspectives about many things in life.

    It has been 9 years since she was diagnosed. Surviving cancer and the harsh treatment were challenging; trying to get back to "normal life" turned out to be even harder. Due to radiation, she lost the thick, strong hair she used to have, with some areas nearly bald. Growing into a teenage girl, she now notices this and has repeatedly wished for thick hair that she could braid. She used to be 75 percentile on the growth chart before cancer, now she is off-the-charts, and needs daily injections of growth hormone to grow. Nevertheless, the impacts on hair and height are minor compared to academics. Her mom talked about how HARD she works, as she desires to excel in academics, music, everything she does, and yet, her brain has been impacted. She works SO hard to keep up - exerting 10 times the effort compared to a normal kid. She constantly perseveres.

    Today, she struggles to make friendships, social interaction is hard. As a teenager, she is self-conscious about her hair loss. With hearing problems, the pronunciation of words is hard, conversations become challenging. Lacking agility, she is usually the last one to be picked by any team in PE class. Combine that with a desire to not want any of her classmates to know about her handicaps and previous treatments, as she wants to be considered as "normal", it is easy to understand why much-needed friendships become difficult. She loves swimming, and her mom encourages her to keep exercising to improve her balance and strength. She also works hard on piano. Her mom says all of these work like therapy for her brain and body.

    The parents are incredible, they continue to do everything they can to give the best opportunities for their daughter. When the mom told me how her daughter felt about herself, I decided to not post her name or picture, to respect the teenager's privacy. I hope as she grows up, she realizes she is a warrior, a survivor of the worst battle a human could endure, and she has emerged victorious, though not unscathed. I'm certain her desire for excellence will take her far, and I hope as she grows, the side-effects are minimized. The parents themselves support St. Judes, as they hope future treatments would not be so toxic.

    The mom very poignantly said, "The brain is really important." You have kicked cancer's butt, brave warrior, these 42 miles are dedicated to you.

    Days 16 to 19: 42 miles for a brave survivor of medulloblastoma, a deadly brain cancer.
    Posted 31 days ago
  • 14.1 mi ride - Evening Ride - Saturday, September 19, 2020
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    Logged this ride 31 days ago
  • 15.1 mi ride - Evening Ride - Friday, September 18, 2020
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    Logged this ride 32 days ago
  • 5.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Thursday, September 17, 2020
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    Logged this ride 33 days ago
  • 8.3 mi ride - Night Ride - Wednesday, September 16, 2020
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    Logged this ride 34 days ago
  • Day 13-15: 21 miles for Jordan. Fighting cancer twice, yet never stops smiling.
    16 Sep 2020

    Jordan was 10 when he was first diagnosed with leukemia. He fought long and hard from being in and out of the ICU, to having to go to rehab to relearn how to walk. But he won that battle.

    He was in remission for 2 years and was doing so well before the family learned March 2nd, 2020 that his cancer came back.

    He’s now fighting cancer for the 2nd time. The treatment is much more aggressive this time and included a bone marrow transplant. Daily nose bleeds, mouth sores, nausea, vomiting, dealing with graft vs host disease and a lot more, Jordan has been through SO much. Yet, he always smiles.

    The family is currently living out of a hotel down the street from the hospital where he got his transplant.

    In the words of Mom Natalie, "Cancer isn’t new to our family. Both my sister and I had cancer as children. And now 30 years later my son has the same cancer we had. Things have been extremely hard for us."

    I am sharing their page for more information. Jordan, you are an incredible warrior, I can't imagine going through this twice. You are just a little older than my own daughter. You are a fighter and a survivor, these 21 miles are dedicated to you.

    https://www.facebook.com/jordanscancerjourney

    Day 13-15: 21 miles for Jordan. Fighting cancer twice, yet never stops smiling.
    Posted 35 days ago
  • 6.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Tuesday, September 15, 2020
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    Logged this ride 35 days ago
  • 10.2 mi ride - Night Ride - Monday, September 14, 2020
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    Logged this ride 36 days ago
  • Day 12: 30 miles for a Nathalia Hawley, her legacy will live forever.
    14 Sep 2020

    12-year old Nathalia had been complaining of leg pain for about 6 months, which were mostly dismissed as a torn ligament or growing pains. Finally, in the summer of 2016, Nat's mom Katy, noticed that she was still limping and her right leg was swollen, and took her to urgent care - where they learnt the devastating diagnosis. She had osteosarcoma - a deadly bone cancer, that had already spread to her lungs.

    Over the next 3 years, she received multiple cycles of intense chemotherapy and surgeries. In the middle of her treatment, her body stopped responding to the original treatment plan, so they had to pivot and try an entirely new chemotherapy cocktail. The new treatment option seemed effective, and surgeons performed lung surgery as planned with good results. But, it stopped working again. Despite failing chemotherapy treatment, doctors went ahead and performed her second surgery on her lungs. From the pathology report, doctors found that two of the tumors had living cancer cells, which meant that the cancer was still very active within her body. Options were running thinner, Nat went on a clinical trial which seemed to make things better, only to have the cancer re-emerge.

    During one of her hospital visits, Nathalia had realized the reality that she could pass away. “She told me if she passed, that she hoped that in some way, she would still be able to help raise awareness and help others who were in the same situation she was in,” Katy said.

    For Katy, the hardest part of watching her daughter go through cancer was seeing the emotional toll treatment took on her. “I think the biggest thing that has changed since all this has happened is to take each day as it comes, to be more present in the moment with my kids, but in life in general,” said Katy. “I want to live life purposefully and to not plan life for what you think it should be. There is this motto I live by, ‘When it rains, look for the rainbow; when it’s dark, look for the stars."

    Nathalia passed away in April 2019, but not before leaving an incredible and lasting mark on the world. During her fight with cancer, Nat inspired thousands of riders during Great Cycle Challenge USA to raise over $1 million. The money is now funding research for better treatments and cures for osteosarcoma, the disease that took her too soon.

    Nat's wisdom was far beyond her years. Her incredible bravery, joyful spirit, and wholehearted love for others were just some of the things that made her so special. Nathalia was resilient, spirited, and humorous, with a heart filled with gratitude. Nat never missed a chance to thank the nurses, doctors, and other caregivers who’ve helped her through her treatment for osteosarcoma.

    We GCC rider will keep riding to honor her until we pedal our way to a world without cancer.

    We will always ride for Nat. Her legacy will live on forever, as breakthrough research in osteosarcoma is well underway. These 30 miles are dedicated to Nat.

    Day 12: 30 miles for a Nathalia Hawley, her legacy will live forever.
    Posted 37 days ago
  • 5.1 mi ride - Evening Ride - Sunday, September 13, 2020
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    Logged this ride 37 days ago
  • 30.0 mi ride - Evening Ride - Saturday, September 12, 2020
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    Logged this ride 38 days ago
  • Day 10-11: 10 indoor miles, GCC raised $2.4 mil in 1 day!
    12 Sep 2020

    While I did 10 laborious, midnight indoor miles on my bike, since rain and work made it challenging to bike outside, I was reflecting on some rather astounding stats. The GCC has had record-breaking fundraising until now, has already raised more than ever before, in just 10 days! Until now $12 million has been raised for childhood cancer research, with $2.4 mill of that raised in 1 day!

    I wanted to highlight a research project that the CCRF (childhood cancer research fund) is actually funding.

    Back when Vinay was first diagnosed, his leukemia cells went for gene analysis, and if my memory serves me right, he was classified as a p21 deletion. He had lost a gene that turned his cell cancerous. After decades of research, the genetic mutation of the cell informs the doctors about the prognosis of the treatments.

    While we stayed on the 9th floor of the main hospital during multiple admissions, we met families with teenage kids, sometimes relapsed with leukemia. One such family was very resigned to poor treatment outcomes as they shrugged helplessly in the family break room, telling me, "What can anyone do? It's the Philadelphia gene mutation." Even with almost no background knowledge, I quickly learnt that the Philadelphia gene mutation is a BAD leukemia and responds very poorly to medications. This is a mutation where 2 specific genes in the white blood cells fuse together, making the cell cancerous. This isn't the only type of fusion gene that exists, but most fusion genes are bad news.

    CCRF is funding a lab in California, working on "Targeting ‘undruggable’ leukemia proteins". Here is what their lab says: “The gene fusions that we study are associated with dismal survival outcomes,” said Dr. Deshpande. “There are no clinically effective targeted therapies for children with these fusions.” The mandated use of extremely aggressive non-specific therapies leads to significant toxic side effects. Many of these patients immediately undergo high-risk bone marrow transplants. Originally thought of as a rare mutation, it is increasingly coming to light that fusions of the AF10 gene happen in a relatively large number of patients." Their lab is working on creating a new treatment option for AF10, that could help kids like Liam, when none exists today, and funded by CCRF, the very money we raise by biking.

    Thank you ALL for reading and donating. Our Team Soaring High has raised almost $15,000 until now! We are indeed doing our part to kick cancer's butt!

    Day 10-11: 10 indoor miles, GCC raised $2.4 mil in 1 day!
    Posted 39 days ago
  • 5.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Friday, September 11, 2020
    Logged this ride 39 days ago
  • 5.0 mi ride - Night Ride - Thursday, September 10, 2020
    Logged this ride 40 days ago
  • Day 9: $8055 raised! 11 celebratory night miles, thinking about cancer siblings
    10 Sep 2020

    Thanks to the bottomless generosity of so many incredible donors, we went from $2946 to $8055 in one day, after the donations were matched by GCC! I went out for another 11.5 miles of late night riding, and I could only think about how much cancer affects siblings. Vani and Vinay are presently thick as thieves, but the battle through cancer shaped Vani in many ways.

    In all the chaos of the diagnosis and constant hospital visits, a cancer sibling gets thrown into utter chaos too. Poor Vani, she told me later that she used to cry at school worrying that her brother would die. Her teacher kept complaining all year that she was very shy, lacked confidence and was withdrawn (completely NOT like Vani at all). Once, when I had returned after many hospital days, Vani said to me ``I thought you were never coming back, I thought you are not going to be my mom anymore''. She was only 7, and she went through simultaneous feelings of being left out, while also feeling very scared for Vinay.

    I remember reading a post of a fellow mom, Casi, whose son Ben was Vani's classmate at daycare, and was diagnosed with leukemia at 4. Ben's big brother Ethan, reminds me a lot of how Vani is to Vinay. These are Casi's own words, "This month tends to focus on Ben and his story, but Ethan remembers more of treatment and hospital stays and frightened parents than Ben does. It has affected him in different ways. Ethan understood at the time that his brother could die and he'd never see him again. Ben thought it he died he would get to haunt us like in Scooby Doo.

    Ethan wouldn't be the young man he is today if not for what he went through. The post-traumatic growth and the post-traumatic stress. It shaped him and changed him in ways I don't fully know yet.

    But I do know this, his self-identity begins with "brother" and he takes that job very seriously."

    Today's miles are dedicated to all the stress cancer siblings face, to give them a unique perspective on this terrible disease. Thank you ALL for reading and for your incredible support!

    Day 9: $8055 raised! 11 celebratory night miles, thinking about cancer siblings
    Posted 41 days ago
  • 11.6 mi ride - Evening Ride - Wednesday, September 9, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 41 days ago
  • $5,000 raised to fight kids' cancer!

    I just hit $5,000 to fight kids' cancer! Thank you so much for your support.

    Posted 41 days ago
  • Day 8: 30 miles for Rob, who beat Lymphoma TWICE.
    9 Sep 2020

    A 16 year old teenager was enjoying life at the beach, being a regular kid, when a friend suddenly pointed out a lump to him on his neck, "What happened to your neck?"....A pediatrician visit, followed by ENT, to finally a biopsy, took the teenager to a place no one really wants to ever go to.

    His Dad gave him the news: "There is good news and bad news. The good news is, it is the curable kind." The teen was diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma. This was 25 years ago. His name is Rob Weismantel. My good friend Christi Gell's brother.

    Lymphoma is a kind of blood cancer that affects lymphocytes, and commonly causes tumors at lymph nodes (typically in the neck, armpits, or groin). Hodgkin's lymphoma is identified by a special kind of cell in the lymph nodes, and typically has a better cure rate than non-Hodgkins.

    16 yr old Rob was diagnosed in March, underwent months of intense treatment - chemo and radiation, and by October, was deemed to be in remission. Unfortunately, a few months later, a mysterious pain began in his hips. After further biopsy, the cancer was found to have returned, and he had to repeat the treatment at much higher doses of chemo. Despite missing a big chunk of high school, and starting college a semester late, Rob successfully beat cancer, and has been cancer free for 25 years!

    Unfortunately, 3 years ago, he found a new lump in his armpit and was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, a completely different type of cancer, unrelated to the first cancer. This time as an adult, he underwent intense treatment for months: a week of chemo followed by 2 weeks off, and then repeat. He continued working, often from the hospital room! And thank heavens, he beat cancer again!!

    I had the privilege of speaking with Rob, and I was most amazed by his attitude. He never once felt "why me?", but thought "why not me?". He considered himself lucky that he could get treatment in MD Anderson, which is one of the top cancer centers in the world, and as an adult, he could continue working, and have good healthcare. I was quite speechless by the end of the conversation.

    This man, not once, complained about the terrible treatments, the toll it probably took on him, the side-effects he has till this day. Instead, he was filled with gratitude, that he was lucky, he had access to great medical care, friends, and family who surrounded him with love, and he survived! He didn't say it, but I'm aware how hard it all can be on the body, the physical, emotional, mental toll, combined with radiation, it is simply brutal. Unlike Vinay, who was just 4, Rob was a kid old enough to understand what it all meant. But he didn't talk about any of that with me... instead, he was cheerful, positive, and hopeful. He shared a story about how his very strict high school suspended a girl for a day because she was had aspirin with her. Rob would go to school with an infuser pump attached to his body, and was being delivered chemotherapy drugs throughout his school day, and he told NO one, to avoid explaining THAT to the school nurses!

    I'm in awe of Rob. Having been through cancer treatments once as a child, and again as an adult, he was reminiscing about how far the treatments have come. When he was a teenager, PET scans and bone marrow transplants were just experimental procedures, and wouldn't be covered by insurance. Now, it is standard practice. He has seen greater options for drugs as an adult than as a child, and has seen first hand how research can shape treatment plans. He has seen improvements in treatments as they have become more targeted. He talked about the mental aspect being so important, and how important it is to advocate for the patient. He now helps other people going through similar cancer treatments, by being available to talk, listen and share his experience.

    Wow, Rob, you have greatly inspired me. We have come so far already, imagine how much better childhood cancer treatments can be?

    Day 8: 30 miles for Rob, who beat Lymphoma TWICE.
    Posted 42 days ago
  • 20.3 mi ride - Evening Ride - Tuesday, September 8, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 42 days ago
  • 10.2 mi ride - Evening Ride - Monday, September 7, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 43 days ago
  • Day 6: 17 miles today, thankful for the Team that helped us beat cancer, and Team Soaring High!
    7 Sep 2020

    Today was a night ride at the picnic loop, a laborious 17 miles, and all I could think of was how it took a village to truly survive the ordeal of cancer. Sudhakar and I of course had to team up to learn to constantly remember the medicines, and take him to the treatments, big sister Vani was such a source of emotional support for Vinay, my parents, my mother-in-law, sister and brother-in-law, all pitched in way too many times to count. We were also so fortunate to have friends and family help us out, many dropped food at the hospital during long admission days, Vani was picked up so many times from school when we were late getting to her!

    A giant hospital team literally saved his life. Every nurse has been patient and kind beyond imagination, every doctor so thoughtful and careful. We love them greatly!

    We are raising money for children's cancer research, and our Team Soaring High has 8 people, each of whom are pedaling hard for the kids! You all are incredible, Alix Macklin, Anupama Bandhuvula, Aswathy Girija, Sophie D'Amico, Nick Blauch, Mike Joosten and Vivek Sinha Together, we all have raised $5283 and have already 676 miles together! In 6 days! We are all kicking cancer's butt together!

    Day 6: 17 miles today, thankful for the Team that helped us beat cancer, and Team Soaring High!
    Posted 44 days ago
  • 17.1 mi ride - Evening Ride - Sunday, September 6, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 44 days ago
  • Day 5: 20 miles for brave Owen, currently battling Lymphoma
    6 Sep 2020

    I met Owen's family in the hospital as he was receiving infusions, his mom Emily is an incredible woman who shared the story about her son.

    In Dec 2018, 2-year old Owen had a pretty bad cough. The doctor said it was viral and gave 5 days of steroids and he was immediately better. Mom returned after a week trip, and noticed the cough came back. Coming from a medical field herself, she noticed it had a stridor sound to it (almost like a screaming cat when trying to get air in). She brought him back to the doctor, was put on albuterol nebulizers, antibiotics, and more steroids. Once again seemed to get better.

    At New Years weekend things got really scary. He was having difficulty breathing one night and an urgent care revealed a slightly positive RSV test. Was told to stop the antibiotics, gave more steroids and added a steroid nebulizer to regimen. She went back to the doctor, who said that Owen's lungs sounded clear and RSV isn’t a big deal in toddlers. The mom forced him to do a CBC at that time which showed that Owen was really anemic and his platelets were low... doctor blew it off to the virus, said they would recheck when he got better. In Emily's words : "I remember going to the doctor I work for and asking if he thought it could be cancer, not even sure why I thought it at that time but something in me knew."

    A week later Owen had collapsed in is Grandma's home, paramedics said his breathing was extremely shallow. At the hospital things were really scary and confusing, even the nurses and doctors had no idea what was going on. He kept going into these hypoxic fits where he would turn purple/blue and couldn’t breathe, he would gasp for air and scratch at anything in sight. In mom's words, "I remember the look in his eyes he was so scared, it was the scariest thing I had seen. I just remember screaming at the nurse to help him, she was even fumbling trying to get some oxygen on him which did help, but didn’t keep him from having the fits. The doctor had come in and mentioned heart failure at first but said they were going to do the X-ray. I was standing there when the image came up on the x ray and say the large mass in his chest. The size of a grapefruit. I feel like at that moment I knew it was lymphoma. Just from my background in the medical field."

    That night, they were transferred to TCH by ambulance, and the next day they performed the biopsy of the mass. He had been in the PACU seemingly doing fine, fortuitously an awesome nurse ordered another CT scan, that picked up a pneumothorax (collapsed lung due to escaping air) caused by the biopsy. He immediately had an emergency surgery and received a chest tube that he kept for about 3-4 days. A couple days later, they received the official diagnosis - grade 2 T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, and started chemotherapy. He is now a happy 4 year old doing very well!

    Mom Emily reminisces that "mom's intuition is real." Prior to arriving at TCH she was blown off too many times. She believes a chest x ray should have been performed a lot earlier. Their family drives many hours from Lake Charles to Houston for all his treatments.

    Recently, they had to evacuate from Hurricane Laura! They have a lot going on, and despite that keep a positive attitude, and enjoy Owen being a previous 4 year old and an older brother! I dedicate today's 20 miler to you Owen, and may you KICK cancer's butt forever!

    Day 5: 20 miles for brave Owen, currently battling Lymphoma
    Posted 45 days ago
  • 20.1 mi ride - Morning Ride - Saturday, September 5, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 46 days ago
  • Day 4: $2673 raised! A crash and burn day... almost did not ride today
    5 Sep 2020

    I woke up this morning completely aghast at the fatigue I felt. No soreness, no pain, just dead legs. I was so sluggish today, I ended up working pretty hard, since I couldn't do much else but sit at a computer.

    Of all the days, today the weather dropped by 20F after a nice cooling rain, and I really wanted to go out for a ride, it was a lovely evening, but my legs still wouldn't move.

    Vinay took advantage of my immobility and thrust his terrible new toy at me and asked me to build him his "marble elevator". He was obsessed with marble run videos on youTube, and discovered that I was the real tooth fairy, and demanded an amazon tooth fairy prize, which was delivered today. He opened the door every 5 min waiting for his "marble elevator" to show up. I do not recommend the toy, it was utter garbage, took hours of installing, had some flimsy plastic gears, I had to resist the urge to destroy it, or I would have to rebuild it again. The good news is we somehow made it work, yay! It was 9pm and I still felt tired, still no ride.

    I decided I needed a rest day, and I don't really need to ride or post every single day.

    And when the time hit close to 10:00pm, I realized that THIS is why I'm doing this challenge. Not just for the good days, but for all days. Exactly on a very sluggish day like this, just when I would think that "FINALLY I can sleep and maybe recover", typically close to 10:00pm at night, back during the cancer days, Vinay would invariably spike a fever. The rule was clear: any temperature > 101F is an INSTANT emergency. I dreaded such nights. They involved 2 pokes for Vinay, plenty of trauma and crying and typically culminated in a hospital admission, since the intensive treatments always made his counts low. We knew the drill.

    So I decided I would atleast go out for a mile, it would be better than 0, and ended up biking 5 easy miles. I wasn't planning to post anything, but this wrote itself.

    5 miles to kick cancer's butt!! Thank you all you AWESOME donors, for supporting me!

    Day 4: $2673 raised! A crash and burn day... almost did not ride today
    Posted 46 days ago
  • 5.1 mi ride - Night Ride - Friday, September 4, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 46 days ago
  • $2,500 raised to fight kids' cancer!

    I just hit $2,500 to fight kids' cancer! Thank you so much for your support.

    Posted 46 days ago
  • Day 3: 30 miles, thinking about a cold 30F day...
    4 Sep 2020

    This morning I slept through the ungodly hour of dawn and felt human again. The weather looked really perfect all morning, super cloudy, not very hot, just perfect. Yet, I had plenty of work so decided to get the bike ride in shortly before I picked up my son from school.

    At 2:00pm, I started the bike ride and very quickly realized that I was terribly mistaken. The temperature said 93F when I started, and was 99F when I finished, and it was a blistering hot and humid day. What was I thinking? My ice cold water at the start was HOT when I finished!

    Strangely enough, while the sun beat down, my mind went to an awful, rare, cold evening, an extremely windy day in December 2016, in Houston. I am certain it was 30F and Vinay was in the middle of his worst cancer treatments, he was 4 years old, and HE WOULDN'T WEAR A PANT. Nor would he wear a long shirt, or a jacket. And it was 30F!! Back in those days, the hospital parking garage was completely full, so I had parked at Rice University, and it was about a 0.5 mile walk to the hospital, through that frigid evening, with a boy who wouldn't wear a jacket. I had tried forcing it on him, and he threw a tantrum in the garage and started bleeding from his knee, which further freaked me out, because he was immune-compromised!

    So now I was carrying this 30lb boy, who thought I was his human jacket, and clung to me like a koala bear, while I wrapped a shawl around him, I wore a jacket which was half open, as Vinay dug his arms and legs inside, and I walked 0.5 miles in 30F, carrying my backpack, Vinay's hospital backpack, my handbag (because handbag! we need a handbag to carry 2 year old receipts), while constantly draping him with a shawl, as he shivered into my ear.

    Normally, I would let him walk when I was tired, and then pick him up again, but those cold days really challenged me, as Vinay would NOT get down, it was too cold.

    A few months later when he got older, and finally started agreed to wear pants, the nurses started cheering!! That was a milestone.

    As I was sweating through the hot and humid 13 mile midday ride, I was grateful I wasn't suffering through those 30F days anymore. Vinay now loves long pants and long shirts and is so flexible!!

    Nevertheless, my afternoon mileage wasn't satisfying, I went back tonight, feeling much, much better to be an owl again, and completed another 17 miles! To those 3 awesome gentlemen chilling in the picnic loop, who asked about my Great Cycling Challenge jersey, and then cheered me on each time I passed by them, THANK YOU! It helped me get through this day! We are all kicking cancer's butt together!!

    Day 3: 30 miles, thinking about a cold 30F day...
    Posted 47 days ago
  • 17.0 mi ride - Evening Ride - Thursday, September 3, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 47 days ago
  • 13.2 mi ride - Afternoon Ride - Thursday, September 3, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 47 days ago
  • Day 2: 20 loopy miles, for Tania Kibble - An Ewing sarcoma survivor!
    3 Sep 2020

    20 years ago, on Jan 3, 2000, a 4-year old Tania was vacationing in El Salvador with her family. She was sitting on the ocean, enjoying the waves when her parents were shocked to see her leg float unnaturally back and forth like her leg was disconnected from her body. Little Tania had been complaining of aches and pains since she hit a piano bench prior to the vacation, so the parents got increasingly worried.

    They canceled their trip and returned to Minnesota, where an X-ray revealed a mass in her hip. Stage 4 Ewing Sarcoma. Sarcoma is a cancerous tumor, and it was in her bones, worse, it had already spread to her lungs.

    Then began a long journey of chemotherapy and radiation, and she was one of the very lucky kids who survived this cancer. Unfortunately, the side effects were severe. Because cancer grew in her hip, her joint had to be cut out and her femur was fused to what was left of the capsule of the joint.

    She cannot ride a bike or tie her right shoe without taking it off. When she needs to use the stairs, she has to consciously think about how to make it up. As a child and teenager, she could not participate in sports, though as she grew up she learned to push her limits and started running.

    The worst side effect was she thought she was infertile. Fast forward 20 years, Tania and her partner Brian were thrilled to learn that cancer did not win, and she was pregnant!

    During labor, Tania had medication to speed the process and doctors were concerned that a number of factors, including her previous radiation treatment, could have put her at a higher risk for complications. She had a whole medical team standing by, and luckily for her, Cleo was born with minimal problems. The best part, she was born on the same day as her cancer diagnosis - Jan 3, 2020, giving special meaning to that date for Tania!

    Throughout her life, Tania thinks her experience with cancer taught her a few key lessons. “It forced me to be adaptable and flexible at a really young age,” she said. “Cancer also forces you to embrace your feelings and be aware of your needs and differences.” She sometimes also deals with unsettling survivor's guilt, and realizes how lucky she is. Today, Tania plans to finish up medical school with Cleo by her side.

    Wow Tania, it is inspiring to learn that you have survived and thrived, despite the side-effects. She hopes for better treatments for kids, and shares her story to inspire more research.

    Today, I woke up early, which is very, very rare for me, but the heat was terrifying, and I wanted to finish biking before the kids' schools started. The bike ride round and round a 0.1 mile loop for 20 miles were mostly spent thinking of the people who have been through cancer treatment as kids, while I watched the moon disappear and the sun appear! Today's ride is for you, Tania! 20 miles for your 20 years surviving cancer. Let's keep kicking cancer's butt!

    Day 2: 20 loopy miles, for Tania Kibble - An Ewing sarcoma survivor!
    Posted 48 days ago
  • 20.1 mi ride - Morning Ride - Wednesday, September 2, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 49 days ago
  • Day 1: Challenge begins! 31 miles for Vinay, as we begin the Childhood Cancer awareness month!
    2 Sep 2020

    I dedicate today's 31 miler to my own precious Vinay who has battled Pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (cancer of the white blood cells) for 3.5 years and has now been cancer-free for 11 months!

    May 22, 2016 was the worst day of our lives. Didn't start out that way, we were moving from the apartment - on THAT day, and Vinay had a fever from the same cold-like virus we all had before, so I gave him ibuprofen, and we kept packing our boxes. When the moving trucks finally left, surrounded by boxes, and my dear family - my husband, parents, sister, and BIL, we all started talking about Vinay, that his fever was back. And we also started discussing those strange bruises we had been noticing for a week. Decided to go to the emergency, "so I could get some antibiotics", and after a blood draw, the unthinkable words were told to us. CANCER.

    The next year was a blur. It was impossible to get through it without ALL the family members helping us out. Over 150 days in the hospital, multiple blood and plasma transfusions, multiple poisonous drugs that could hurt his heart, liver, kidneys, nerve damage, brain, mental abilities, ... were pumped in his tiny body. Every drug wiped him down, he could barely talk, or move, and had no appetite, and as soon he recovered a little bit, the next poisonous infusion would be given. Despite the side effects, the poisons (chemo), saved his life. Chemo kills cancer, but it also kills plenty of healthy tissue, and the goal is to kill cancer, but not the human.

    At diagnosis, Vinay's bone marrow was filled with 92% cancer cells, and had spread to his spinal cord, so he was deemed "very high risk" and received a very aggressive treatment protocol. We were lucky that he responded well to the treatment, the prognosis of cancer treatments solely depends on how well the kid responds, and that is SO scary. It was terrifying to learn that a kid undergoing the exact same procedure as Vinay, reacted slightly less robustly to the treatments, eventually had to receive a bone marrow transplant, and died from complications following that. There is always fear in the back of the parent's mind. Fear of the unknown, fear of more ill-health befalling our precious baby.

    If I learnt anything from Vinay, he solely focused on "how can I have fun", even when undergoing the worst treatments. While it is true that he was too little to be completely cognizant of what he was going through, he was aware of the pain of the pokes, and still suffers from panic attacks when 2 nurses gather together and approach him. Yet, he spent most of the 3.5 years in figuring how to have fun, despite his limited energies.

    I'm also afraid. I'm afraid of relapse. I'm afraid of the sheer helplessness that follows such a diagnosis. The "probability of that happening" means nothing to me. I'll always fear cancer. Yet, Vinay chooses fun over fear, and I love his attitude. Even the biking challenge seems fearsome at the start, "maybe it'll be too much", ..... but Vinay inspires me. His joy is infectious, and I want him to stay healthy forever! When I rode the bike, I was reminded of little Vinay riding the red hospital tricycle, pedaling furiously while still attached to his IV pole!! No excuses for me, I will ride my hardest! I hope better treatments will give us better options if ever any parent's worst fears ever come true...... I hope for the day when cancer will be nothing to fear.

    Day 1: Challenge begins! 31 miles for Vinay, as we begin the Childhood Cancer awareness month!
    Posted 49 days ago
  • 31.1 mi ride - Morning Ride - Tuesday, September 1, 2020
    Map
    Logged this ride 50 days ago
  • Aug 31: Excited to start the Great Cycling Challenge, 2020.
    31 Aug 2020

    Ready....Set....GO! The challenge starts tomorrow! I'm so excited to ride as many miles as I can for children's cancer research.

    The great cycling challenge is primarily for childhood cancer research, an underfunded research area. The GCC covers gaps in funding for many childhood cancers and helps bring clinical trials to mainstream protocols. Since its inception, it has provided $186 million towards cancer research, bringing forward many new innovations for kids who otherwise had limited options.

    This month, I plan to share stories about kids going through such treatments and dedicate rides to them.

    For me, this will be a month of reflection, for I never want to forget what my son went through, and the reality that so many kids and their families go through every day. I believe better options DO exist, and our work together as a TEAM, and as a community will make a difference to the lives for so many kids to come.

    Thrilled to have TEAM SOARING HIGH grow to 6 members! Welcome, Nick Blauch, Sophia D'Amico and Vivek Sinha! Let's have a blast and kick cancer to the curb!!

    Thank you to all the awesome donors! Your support is what makes this possible.

    Aug 31: Excited to start the Great Cycling Challenge, 2020.
    Posted 50 days ago
  • Aug 25: Vinay's checkup at the oncologist, update!
    27 Aug 2020

    Yesterday, Vinay had his bi-monthly check-up with the oncologist, and it was a lot of anxiety for poor Vinay. He kept trying to steel himself for the dreaded IV poke. He could get a finger poke, but decided the IV poke was better, "because it doesn't bleed for hours". However, my own anxiety was because of COVID-19. We were given new masks right at the parking garage, but Vinay had a better child mask, so I doubled his mask, and he was not happy. I didn't let him press the elevator buttons, so he was not happy. I didn't let him run and throw tantrums to prepare himself for his upcoming poke, so he was not happy. I sanitized his hands every 10 seconds, he was not happy.

    The nurses are AMAZING... His anxiety was reaching a peak, I held in my lap, to prepare him for his poke, he kept talking...."only 2 nurses", "are you going to hurt me?"... and then he said something unexpected to the nurses.

    Vinay: "Did I got this?"

    Nurse 1: "You absolutely got this, You got this."

    Vinay: "Can I do this?"

    Nurse 1: " Yes, you can! You can do this."

    Vinay: "Will it hurt a lot?"

    Nurse 1: "Just a pinch, it's just a pinch."

    Nurse 2: "Can you find me a picture of Moana in this book?"

    Vinay: Points to the picture, turns back to Nurse 1: "are you done?"

    Nurse 1: "All done! You are so brave!"

    The worst was all done. His sweet conversation melted my heart, he has come along way from screaming at the nurses, shrieking "are you trying to kill me?".

    He continues to have morbid conversations about death, he stared out the window from the 14th floor as we waited for our oncologist, and cheerfully said "If the window breaks, and I fall, I will die! But if there is a soft pit instead of concrete I can jump down." It was one of those conversations, where his language difficulties made him pause, but he finally put them in words! No, no, no sweet Vinay, it is the 14th floor! Guess all of us look down from a high floor and have a fear of falling.

    My biggest worry was all about COVID exposure, but it wasn't just my worry. Prior to covid, my oncologist would check us without any masks. Four months ago, she was wearing surgical masks. Two months ago, she was wearing a surgical mask and shield. Yesterday, she was wearing an N95, 2 surgical masks and a shield, and scrubs.

    She talked about her concerns for her own family. She has been the person I trust the most in all the decisions we make as a family during this COVID crises, She helped us make the decision to send Vinay to school, as it is necessary for his mental health, and she liked all the precautions the school is taking.

    She said that she has never seen a virus as devastating as this one. While most cancer kids with COVID have been fine, there have been two children undergoing cancer treatment who died with COVID. Previously, there have been flu-related deaths in immune-compromised cancer kids, but only when they were NOT vaccinated. She had never seen a flu death in vaccinated kids, for as long as she could remember. This is why Vinay always got the flu shot, even during treatment, because flu could be deadly for such kids. And now we have COVID on top of everything else. I remember living life on the edge with cancer, my heart goes out to the double stress of cancer treatments during a pandemic.

    We are very lucky that Vinay's check up went well, and he is feeling good right now. We now have 2 more months before the next visit. Upon returning home, I learnt that a major hurricane is coming this way towards Houston, and so I absolutely needed to prepare for it. I went out for a lovely 21 miles masked bike ride to the white oak bayou trail, feeling thankful for a good visit.

    For this is the only thing that I can do, is to raise awareness, and together we can help fund better treatments for children with cancer. Children should be living life, not fighting it!

    Aug 25: Vinay's checkup at the oncologist, update!
    Posted 55 days ago
  • Aug 19: $1462 raised...GCC Tribute Day! How it all began....
    26 Aug 2020

    Today is GCC tribute day!!!! A tribute to all the little warriors battling cancer.... Here’s a little information on how The Great Cycle Challenge USA started. It all started with the caring selflessness of Katie Hageboeck, for without her, none of this would be possible. Here is her story:

    *******************

    In 1979, 13-year old Katie Hageboeck, from Wayzata, MN, was nearing the end of her 16-month battle with leukemia. Knowing she was losing her battle, Katie asked that the money she’d been saving for a 10-speed bicycle be donated to a little-known fund for the University of Minnesota called Children’s Cancer Research Fund.

    Katie’s dream was to find a cure so that other kids facing cancer would survive. A little over a year after Katie’s passing, her parents, Diana and Norm, and friends of the family organized what they thought was a one-time benefit fundraiser to honor Katie’s wish. Thirty five years later, this ”Dawn of a Dream’” benefit is still taking place, and Children’s Cancer Research Fund has grown from a small grassroots fundraiser into a national non-profit committed to finding a cure for childhood cancer.

    Starting with a little girl donating money she’d saved to buy a bicycle, Katie never got the chance to ride a new bike. So, we will be riding for her in this year’s Great Cycle Challenge USA to realize her dream of a world without childhood cancer. Courtesy:

    Children’s Cancer Research Fund

    Great Cycle Challenge USA

    *******************

    Today is tribute day, to all the amazing warriors fighting cancer! 4 years ago, Vinay was diagnosed with cancer. On that day, I wrote: ”May 22, 2016: Vinay had been suffering from a virus, with a cough. We came to the doctor wondering why his fever stayed high after 4 days, and after noticing a pattern of bruises on his body over the last 4 days. Turns out to be CANCER. Leukemia. We are in total shock, I am still in denial. This cannot be true. Writing to update friends and family who have questions, and to keep a record of what’s going on. And to vent lots of frustration, and confusion. It’s been a heartbreaking day for us.” Today, he is cancer free! It was an honor that my precious Vinay was featured on New York Times Billboard, for his fight against cancer!

    Aug 19: $1462 raised...GCC Tribute Day! How it all began....
    Posted 55 days ago
  • Training ride Aug 17: 12 night miles done, $1402 raised, celebrating the formation of Team Soaring High!
    19 Aug 2020

    We have officially 2 new members joining Team Soaring High! Yay!! One is riding on an indoor bike, and the other is an avid cyclist! So excited to have you both Anupama Bandhuvula and Alix Sylvia!! Welcome to the team! I rode another night to celebrate!

    Let's kick cancer's butt together!

    Training ride Aug 17: 12 night miles done, $1402 raised, celebrating the formation of Team Soaring High!
    Posted 63 days ago
  • Aug 14: 20 evening miles, $1262 raised
    15 Aug 2020

    Finally got out of home a little earlier than midnight, and went to the Terry Hershey Park. A great biking place, except that one would pass by enough people that I wasn't comfortable riding without a mask. I put on a surgical mask, thinking about how uncomfortable it was going to be, all the terrible moisture and awful humidity, ... and barely a couple miles in, something amazing happened. As my mind drifted away, I completely forgot all about the mask! I adapted to it! We humans are really quite adaptable, aren't we?

    It is also true that we adapt when something as horrible as cancer strikes. Life now is normal (not as in 2020 normal), but "no cancer" normal. And every moment when Vinay does something goofy, has excess energy, and tries to tell us that the new crack in the phone was NOT because he bit it, but because it happened all by itself, we are just amazed at this "normal". Not tired, sleepy, cranky, angry, steroid-ragey, disoriented, ... and that was just the maintenance phase normal. And in the maintenance, we were thankful we were not undergoing the 1 year intensive when the lines between life and death were always too close for comfort. Every stage, we adapted, and yet, I still think we were very lucky.

    I remember at the very start, we were told about all the possible side effects from the chemo... possible nerve damage, organ damage, heart damage, long term memory and attention issues,... but all of these atleast constitute life.

    A little girl undergoing the exact same treatment as Vinay, responded a little worse to the chemo than Vinay, a little more cancer remained after 3 months, and that led to her needing a bone -marrow transplant, that led down a very different path from Vinay at the end... despite being on the exact the same protocol for 6 months. Bone marrow transplant doesn't have a great success rate, and despite having a good match, and a successful transplant, the poor girl did not survive a virus she got in that immune-compromised state. I don't know how anyone can ever adapt to that.

    And leukemia is still considered a success story! Some kids endure life long heart damage, and it is still considered a success story. A survivor from brain tumor has way more life-long side effects, we know a 11-year-old who survived medulloblastoma, now has damaged vision, hearing, complete thyroid dysfunction, learning, and speech issues,... and it is still a success story. Another 18 yr old with medulloblastoma (brain cancer) did not survive. It broke my heart reading their journey, the Dad gave the tumors names and tried to inject humor, describing that the chemo did not shrink tumors Timmy and Tommy, and a new unnamed tumor popped up at the check-up. The 18 yr old boy knew he was terminal, and wanted to make the 4-5 hr drive to St. Jude's himself, as he knew he would lose his ability to drive pretty soon. They would have taken any disability to just survive, yet no drugs worked for him, and they could do nothing but provide pain medication and end of life care.

    Today, we have better drugs than 10 years ago. And lots of new therapies that show more promise, but childhood cancer only receives 1% of the funds of all cancers. Many times doctors have no plan B, if the prescribed protocol doesn't work. So we keep riding, and keep fundraising, for I do wish for treatments where: 1) kids live, and 2) they don't have to live with life-long side-effects! Let's kick cancer's butt!!

    Thank you so much, donors and supporters! You guys make it happen.

    Aug 14: 20 evening miles, $1262 raised
    Posted 67 days ago
  • Aug 8: A 20 mile night ride, wishing for better brain cancer treatments.
    10 Aug 2020

    The first time I ever heard of childhood cancer was in 2011, when a colleague's 4 year old daughter, a happy child who always wanted long Rapunzel hair, started vomiting and walking unsteadily. It was an immense shock to the family when she was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor - grade 4 medulloblastoma. The next 8 months, we watched the family fight, taking turns to spend a month with their daughter, while the other parent worked and watched the younger one. The little girl endured surgeries, chemo, radiation, and countless procedures.. before beating the cancer down!

    Unfortunately, she still suffers from multiple vision and hearing issues, takes growth hormone injections daily, by herself, and has side effects that can be seen in all aspects of life, except her radiant personality and resilient spirit.

    While leukemia is the most common childhood cancer, it is followed by brain cancers. The Great Cycling Challenge highlights multiple kids each year, so the riders can learn more about the challenges the kids face, and know why we need to raise money for this. One such kid is 8-year old Gunner.

    When Gunner was just three years old, his mother Andrea noticed he was having vision problems. After bouncing from the pediatrician, to an ophthalmologist, to the emergency room, a CT scan confirmed their worst fears...

    Gunner had a huge mass right in the center of his brain. He needed emergency surgery and a shunt to allow the fluid to drain.

    "The shunt they used was external, so the fluid was coming out of his head into a bag, which was so scary,” Andrea said.

    "It was very stressful trying to keep the head of an active 3-year-old safely level with the bag."

    "Looking back, I don’t know how we did that”, Andrea told us.

    At this time, his family never imagined that he’d still be in treatment four and a half years later.

    Now 8 years old, he will enthusiastically ask classmates if they want to feel his shunt, a battle wound in his courageous fight against cancer.

    Sadly, Gunner's battle is still not over.

    “Gunner has one of the types of cancer where there is no cure, and our treatment options have become very limited,” Andrea said.

    "A clinical trial medication has been our lifeline. So anything we can do to help move these meds out of clinical trials and make them more available for kids like Gunner, we will do."

    "Research is needed for more options to be developed as well. Feeling like we are running out of options is crippling.”

    His family is passionate about advocating for better treatment options and cures, as there may not be other options for Gunner if his current therapy stops working.

    "Any type of cancer is horrible, but for Gunner, we have to manage it like a chronic disease because we don’t know if it will ever go away.”

    Andrea says the possibility of research that could lead to another option, another clinical trial, another life-saving drug, is what keeps her family going.

    Gunner’s battle is far from over, but his spirit is strong and he will never stop fighting!

    And so must we! We must never stop fighting. Let's kick cancer to the curb!

    Aug 8: A 20 mile night ride, wishing for better brain cancer treatments.
    Posted 72 days ago
  • $1,000 raised to fight kids' cancer!

    I just hit $1,000 to fight kids' cancer! Thank you so much for your support.

    Posted 73 days ago
  • Aug 6: Another 15 mi night ride, thinking of how far we have come.
    7 Aug 2020

    A normally energetic 3 year girl felt tired and feverish one Spring of 1953. The parents didn't notice the bruises on her body, and took her to the family pediatrician, who tested her, and told them their little girl had advanced leukemia, and advised them to "not tell anyone, go home, make her comfortable and in 3 weeks, she will be gone". Disregarding that doctor, the parents went all out to save their precious baby and took her to experts all over the country to treat her, and though she seemed to get better at times, she never reached remission. With her tiny body covered in bruises and a 100 stomach ulcers... 6 months later, she breathed her last. That is the story of Robin Bush, daughter of Barbara and George H.W. Bush Senior.

    Back in the day, leukemia was a killer disease. 3-5 yr old, kids had bruises, fevers, headaches and bleeding, bleeding from their ears, eyes, nose, skin, internal bleeding, vomiting blood, most died within the week. The hospital looked like a butcher shop, with different hospitals trying their own drugs with futility. The cancerous white blood cells would rapidly die, but never completely, returning with a vengeance, multiplying like crazy, now resistant to the same drugs previously given. The situation was so hopeless that doctors preferred to just give palliative end of life treatment as kids dropped dead before them.

    Why did leukemia kids bleed so much? Normal people have platelets between 100-250K, white blood cells 8-10K. Vinay's biggest symptom in the week leading to his cancer discovery was fever, cough, and a new bruise every day. We thought he was playing too rough, like a typical 4 year old. His blood counts had revealed his bone marrow was 93% filled with cancerous white blood cells, crowding out the production of much-needed clotting platelets.

    Dr. Emil Freireich, a young researcher in the 60's was the first to combine the chemotherapy drugs that had been used separately in various hospitals until then, and pioneered combination chemotherapy. He combined multiple drugs to attack those nasty cancer cells, killing them before they knew what hit them. His work led to the combination therapy for leukemia using 6-MP, vincristine, prednisone, and methotrexate that was shown to actually cure leukemia (Vinay took all 4 drugs for all the 3.5 years). Today, we have a multi-drug, multi-year protocol that has been very effective, and we even have a cure-rate for some cases. Though the long term effects and toxicity are costs the kids pay all way into adulthood.

    Just this year Vinay's oncologist was telling me really excitedly that the cancer protocol has changed just last year, to include some brand new treatments! A similar kid like Vinay diagnosed today, would only get 2.5 years of treatment (instead of 3.5) and much fewer vincristines, to reduce long term toxicity. THAT is what research does for us. Constantly innovating, and new treatments being available to improve the outcome for kids.

    Last night's ride I kept thinking about Robin Bush. We have come a long way, and we will get even further in the future! We are going to KICK cancer's butt!!

    Aug 6: Another 15 mi night ride, thinking of how far we have come.
    Posted 75 days ago
  • Aug 6: Another 15 mi night ride, thinking of how far we have come.
    7 Aug 2020

    A normally energetic 3 year girl felt tired and feverish one Spring of 1953. The parents didn't notice the bruises on her body, and took her to the family pediatrician, who tested her, and told them their little girl had advanced leukemia, and advised them to "not tell anyone, go home, make her comfortable and in 3 weeks, she will be gone". Disregarding that doctor, the parents went all out to save their precious baby and took her to experts all over the country to treat her, and though she seemed to get better at times, she never reached remission. With her tiny body covered in bruises and a 100 stomach ulcers... 6 months later, she breathed her last. That is the story of Robin Bush, daughter of Barbara and George H.W. Bush Senior.

    Back in the day, leukemia was a killer disease. 3-5 yr old, kids had bruises, fevers, headaches and bleeding, bleeding from their ears, eyes, nose, skin, internal bleeding, vomiting blood, most died within the week. The hospital looked like a butcher shop, with different hospitals trying their own drugs with futility. The cancerous white blood cells would rapidly die, but never completely, returning with a vengeance, multiplying like crazy, now resistant to the same drugs previously given. The situation was so hopeless that doctors preferred to just give palliative end of life treatment as kids dropped dead before them.

    Why did leukemia kids bleed so much? Normal people have platelets between 100-250K, white blood cells 8-10K. Vinay's biggest symptom in the week leading to his cancer discovery was fever, cough, and a new bruise every day. We thought he was playing too rough, like a typical 4 year old. His blood counts had revealed his bone marrow was 93% filled with cancerous white blood cells, crowding out the production of much-needed clotting platelets.

    Dr. Emil Freireich, a young researcher in the 60's was the first to combine the chemotherapy drugs that had been used separately in various hospitals until then, and pioneered combination chemotherapy. He combined multiple drugs to attack those nasty cancer cells, killing them before they knew what hit them. His work led to the combination therapy for leukemia using 6-MP, vincristine, prednisone, and methotrexate that was shown to actually cure leukemia (Vinay took all 4 drugs for all the 3.5 years). Today, we have a multi-drug, multi-year protocol that has been very effective, and we even have a cure-rate for some cases. Though the long term effects and toxicity are costs the kids pay all way into adulthood.

    Just this year Vinay's oncologist was telling me really excitedly that the cancer protocol has changed just last year, to include some brand new treatments! A similar kid like Vinay diagnosed today, would only get 2.5 years of treatment (instead of 3.5) and much fewer vincristines, to reduce long term toxicity. THAT is what research does for us. Constantly innovating, and new treatments being available to improve the outcome for kids.

    Last night's ride I kept thinking about Robin Bush. We have come a long way, and we will get even further in the future! We are going to KICK cancer's butt!!

    Aug 6: Another 15 mi night ride, thinking of how far we have come.
    Posted 75 days ago
  • Aug 3rd: 2nd training ride, 14 sore miles done and $700+ raised!
    4 Aug 2020

    The previous bike ride went great, having ridden relatively little before,... but today I barely went a couple of miles and I was ready to be done. I was groaning inside, feeling quite sore. I just wanted to get to a double-digit mileage! It is always hard at the start, but if experience is any teacher, it will get easier.

    To keep my mind distracted on the ride, I asked myself, "Why am I doing this?" particularly because we are surrounded by so much anxiety, uncertainty, and tragic deaths. The first few months of the pandemic, I just followed the COVID-19 deaths on a daily basis, feeling so much pain with every number, thinking each one is a human being with a family, and the feeling of loss made me a wreck. And then the numbers mounted and led to a deadening inside... I can't really comprehend the deaths anymore. Just that those people would all still be here today if it weren't for this pandemic. And then we talk about the case fatality rate (CFR) or death rate, is 2.3%? Is it 1%? and we all know it breaks up by age. And deaths are still one side of the story... we don't even know bad the long term effects are and how badly it can affect some people. And some people will be fine.

    So in the middle of all this tragedy, why am I riding for childhood cancer? Aren't all deaths equally painful? I started this bike ride thinking about COVID-19 and cancer (yes I know, I'm a very cheerful person to be around). I realized that we group deaths in people based on the cause. We have automobile deaths, and heart disease deaths, and COVID-19 deaths, and childhood cancer deaths are another category. And the average death rate for childhood cancer is 14%... in fact cancer is the leading cause of death by disease in American children. And death is just one side of the story. There remain long term effects of chemo, that severely affect the quality of life. And some cancers are much worse than others, and some people recover with the exact same treatment that kills some others.

    So again, why ride for childhood cancer research? As I looped around the picnic loop at 11:00pm tonight, I was reminded of Trevor Noah's talk, where he talks about categories of deaths, and he says, "We have to TRY". We always want to TRY to reduce the deaths in each category. The doctors and frontline workers, and researchers are working with their lives on the line to reduce the COVID-19 deaths, and another group of researchers and cancer doctors are also working with their lives on the line during this pandemic to save the lives of thousands of children with cancer. That is all we can do, is TRY. So I found my answer. I can ride, and do my part, so the researchers can continue to do their part and improve childhood cancer research. 5 years ago, the average survival rate of childhood cancer was 58%. Today it is 84%. We have come a long way, and it will continue to keep getting better.

    And I know why I will always ride for childhood cancer research... I really want no kid to go through what my sweet little boy went through for 3.5 years of leukemia treatment, which struck like a bolt of lightning when he was just 4 years old. And we have been one of the lucky ones! He is alive and doing well. We are grateful the doctors treated him with so much care, and he has been 8 months cancer free... and counting.... but with improved treatments, maybe it won't be so toxic to the body and not have such nasty side effects! We are riding to fund that improvement in little kids. Thank you so much, dear sponsors, for donating, particularly during such a hard time. I am grateful for any support, a donation, or a cheer, everything counts.

    And if you have a bike, and can ride safely, consider joining me! I started a team (Team Soaring High), and we can all motivate each other. It is free to join, you can have your own goals, and whatever you do contributes to the team goals. It will be fun!

    Aug 3rd: 2nd training ride, 14 sore miles done and $700+ raised!
    Posted 78 days ago
  • $500 raised to fight kids' cancer!

    I just hit $500 to fight kids' cancer! Thank you so much for your support.

    Posted 80 days ago
  • 1st training ride for GCC 2020 - 15 midnight miles done.
    2 Aug 2020

    2020 has been a crazy year so far. It is one for the history books. The Great Cycling Challenge starts on September 1st this year, and I thought a lot about whether I would join the GCC this year. Because

    1. Life has been super stressful

    2. Pandemic has messed me up completely.

    However, I knew that I wanted to do the GCC again. For precisely the same reasons.

    1. Life is super stressful - but that is always true. Cycling can help.

    2. Pandemic has messed me up. Cycling can help.

    But truly, the most important reason is that I can't imagine how terrible it must be for cancer families right now. I can't imagine the stress we went through for 3.5 years for Vinay's leukemia treatment compounded with a vicious life-threatening virus that could be deadly for immune-compromised kids, and just all the additional mental stress that the pandemic has brought in 2020. My heart goes out to every cancer family right now.

    I want to do my bit in raising awareness, and raising funds that benefit kids who undergo cancer treatment, because pandemic or not, cancer doesn't stop. So I shouldn't stop either.

    Today is 1st August, I haven't ridden much all year. Its time to start training! The weather was lovely all day, but of course, I only started at 11pm in the night, and am quite happy to have looped around my community for 15 miles! Yay!

    Last year was a blast. This year, I invite you to join me! We have to stay super safe, and only do what we can, considering the circumstances, but if you have a bike and are able to be safe, consider joining me! Message me if interested and I will form a team: "Team Soaring High". We will all still have our individual goals: ride goals and fundraising goals, but we also are a team! Let's do this.

    1st training ride for GCC 2020 - 15 midnight miles done.
    Posted 80 days ago
  • $250 raised to fight kids' cancer!

    I just hit $250 to fight kids' cancer! Thank you so much for your support.

    Posted 100 days ago
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